Leprechaun

Leprechaun is a type of fairy commonly known in Irish traditions. The fairy leprechaun is usually disguised as an old man garbed in green or red coat and is a shenanigan. In Irish mythology, Leprechauns, like other fairy creatures, have also been linked to the Tuatha Dé Danann. The leprechauns are known as cobblers, who makes shoes and the gold coins they get, in return are stored in a hidden gold pot at the end of the rainbow. Whenever they are caught by humans, Leprechauns grant three wishes in exchange of their release. Leprechauns are often depicted in books and movies as short heighted with a hat and a beard, although they have been perceived to be the tallest creatures among the mount dwellers.

The word leprechaun is derived from Irish word leipreachán, which is defined by Patrick Dinneen as a sprite, pigmy or leprechaun. The deeper derivation of it is much uncertain. Some of the sources suggest that the word is linked with corruption of the Middle Irish luchrupán. Luchrupán is derived from Old Irish luchorpán which is known as a compound of the roots (lú –small) and corp (body). The influence of Ecclesiastical Latin on Irish language is obvious from the root corp, which was adapted from Latin corpus. For word leprechaun there have been different spellings used in English that include ‘leprehaun’, ‘lepreehawn’ and ‘lubrican’. The first English spelled leprechaun was used in the comedy, The Honest Whore Part 2 in 1604 by Dekker. It was used as, “As for your Irish lubrican, that spirit / whom by preposterous charms thy lust hath rais’d / in a wrong circle.”

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